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Province of British Columbia
NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Release
2024MOTI0080-000952
June 18, 2024
Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure
New funding will improve access to active transportation

VICTORIA – More people will soon be able to leave their cars behind and choose active ways to get around efficiently and affordably across communities in British Columbia.

Communities in the south coast, southern Interior and northern regions are receiving provincial investments in active transportation that will make a difference in the way people travel. The investments will build new active transportation infrastructure for people to use their preferred method of travel safely and with more access to their community.

“When people have the opportunity to use safe, efficient and affordable travel options, they take it,” said Rob Fleming, Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure. “That’s why we’re building overpasses, trail networks and bike lanes that will give a new generation new ways to travel within and between their communities.”

The investments total $85 million and will improve the efficiency of transportation networks in nine communities, including more direct connections to schools, employment and recreation. The Active Transportation Capital Fund projects are building active transportation infrastructure on ministry-owned rights-of-way in the province. The infrastructure projects are improving upon grants made through the Active Transportation Infrastructure Grant program, which funded 80 projects worth $24 million in 2024.

For example, the Cycle 16 multi-use pathway will be completed in the Bulkley Nechako District. The additional nine-kilometre long, three-metre-wide path along Highway 16 will connect the communities of Smithers and Telkwa.

“This longer pathway connects our communities and broadens our active transportation horizon,” said Nathan Cullen, MLA for Stikine. “The advocacy of Cycle 16 and the outpouring of support from so many people across the Bulkey Valley has made this happen. Safer, cleaner and healthier – that’s what this project means to our community and our kids.”

Through collaboration with Indigenous and local governments, projects have been selected to bridge the gaps between existing active transportation networks or build the foundation for future investments in active transportation infrastructure.

Learn More:

To learn more about CleanBC, visit: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/environment/climate-change/action/cleanbc/cleanbc_roadmap_2030.pdf

A backgrounder follows.

 
Contact:
 
Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure
Media Relations
250 356-8241
 

 
Province of British Columbia
BACKGROUNDER
For Immediate Release
2024MOTI0080-000952
June 18, 2024
Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure
What to know about active transportation capital projects

The Province is providing $85 million toward 11 active transportation (AT) projects across communities in B.C.

South coast region:

  • Howes Street multi-use pathway – The design and construction of a protected multi-use path on the west side of Howes Street, which provides a safe connection from Ewan Avenue in the Queensborough neighbourhood to Boyd Street, the central commercial district, connecting to existing AT infrastructure on the local network.
  • Tillicum pedestrian overpass – The design and construction of a multi-use pathway overpass allowing for grade-separated AT infrastructure for Galloping Goose Trail within the capital region.

Northern region:

  • Cycle 16 multi-use pathway – The Cycle 16 multi-use pathway will be receiving an additional nine-kilometre, three-metre-wide path along Highway 16 between the communities of Smithers and Telkwa. Both Telkwa and Smithers have paths that will be connected upon the completion of all phases of the project. 
  • Highway 35 multi-use pathway – The first phase of the project will be completing design for a 12-kilometre multi-use pathway adjacent to Highway 35 connecting Village of Burns Lake cycle network and Tchesinkut Lake community with residences and businesses in between.
  • Highway 97 Hart multi-use pathway – Engineering to determine the feasibility of a multi-use path between Cameron Street bridge and Northwood Road intersection. A multi-use pathway would connect the Hart residential neighbourhood with services and amenities in downtown Prince George.

Southern Interior region:

  • Clements Crescent intersection transit and pedestrian connectivity improvements – The engineering and construction of active transportation and transit-stop improvements at the Highway 97 and Clements Crescent intersection, and a new separated pathway south to Ponderosa Drive along Highway 97. This project will connect Peachland’s shopping plaza, grocery store, and elementary school, and provide access to Route 70 regional transit service. 
  • H3A Kootenay Lake bridge AT improvements – Engineering to determine the feasibility of constructing protected bicycle lanes and sidewalks on the bridge. The project will improve safety, comfort and accessibility of AT users crossing the bridge. It will provide connectivity to the active transportation network, including Nelson’s Cycling and Trail Network, the Trans-Canada Trail, and other recreational and commuter destinations on the north and south shore of Kootenay Lake.
  • Shuswap Road multi-use pathway from Sun Rivers to Sienna Ridge – A one-kilometre pathway from Shuswap Road and Sun Rivers intersection to Sienna Ridge development. It will provide safe access within Tk’emlups Reserve with year-round AT infrastructure. Local residents and recreational users, band offices, school and local developments will be connected.
  • Shuswap Road planning for a multi-use pathway from Sienna Ridge to La Farge – This project is to complete a feasibility assessment, which will tie into the Shuswap multi-use pathway at Sienna Ridge and terminates at La Farge.
  • H1 west and H5 Thompson River crossings – This project is to complete engineering for potential AT improvements on overpasses of Highway 1 through Kamloops and the Thompson River. The project aims to provide appropriate and technically feasible cycling facilities, which align with the City of Kamloops’ active transportation plan.
  • Highway 5 Nicola interchange pedestrian and cycle safety – The project will provide safe pedestrian and cycling connection across the Nicola interchange between the eastern city centre and the development occurring on the west, and will align with the City of Merritt’s AT strategy.
 
Contact:
 
Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure
Media Relations
250 356-8241
 

 
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